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Research

head and face pain

Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Sensory neurons that serve the head and face are wired directly into one of the brain’s principal emotional signaling hubs, research finds. This accounts for why people consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears, and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body. Sensory neurons elsewhere in…

oral infection bacteria

Oral Infection & the Systemic Disease Connection

**Note from the authors: This paper is a work in progress and is still being debated by the authors.  This is a preliminary report.** Oral Microbes and Systemic Disease Over the last twenty plus years, dental disease has been reported to be associated with numerous systemic diseases[1], including, heart disease[2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]…

map

From the Concept of “Inflammaging” to P4 Medicine

Human aging is characterized by a chronic low grade on inflammation and this phenomenon has been called “inflammaging.” Inflammaging is a significant risk factor for mortality in elderly people. Aging phenotypes: Change in Body Composition (Less Muscle Mass) Less Efficient Energy Production & Utilization Loss of Metabolic Homeostasis Decrease in Acquired Immunity Increase in Low-Grade…

estrogen therapy for osteoporisis

Estrogen Therapy for Osteoporosis May Prevent Gum Disease

Estrogen therapy treatment for osteoporosis may also help prevent gum disease, according to a new study that looked at the prevalence of periodontitis in postmenopausal women. Women over the age of 50 who took estrogen for osteoporosis—in which bones become weak and brittle from tissue loss—were 44 percent less likely to have severe periodontitis than…

soda can - sugary drinks

Can sugary drinks damage your brain?

New research suggests that excess sugar—especially the fructose in sugary drinks—might damage your brain. Researchers using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) found that people who drink sugary beverages frequently are more likely to have poorer memory, smaller overall brain volume, and a significantly smaller hippocampus—an area of the brain important for learning and…

diabetes medicine

Diabetes Could Cause up to 12% of US deaths

The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes in the US is as high as 12 percent—three times higher than estimates based on death certificates suggest—a new analysis shows. For a new study, published in PLOS ONE, researchers used two large datasets that included more than 300,000 people to estimate the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes…

arthritis in hands

Bacteria in the Mouth May Trigger Arthritis

The bacteria that cause chronic gum infections may also trigger the autoimmune inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), new evidence suggests. The new findings could have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, the researchers say. In the journal Science Translational Medicine, the investigators identify the common denominator in gum disease and in many people…

Lee Ostler, Amy Doneen, Bradley Bale

Proof that Optimal Medical Care and Oral Wellness Can Quickly Shrink Arterial Plaque and Stabilize Cardiovascular Disease

Just in time for National Gum Care Month, a new study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Archives of Medical Science, demonstrates that a comprehensive approach to heart attack, stroke and diabetes prevention that includes oral wellness—our patented BaleDoneen Method—can quickly shrink the size of arterial plaque deposits by more than 50% in patients with cardiovascular…

head and neck cancer research

Drug Doubles Survival for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

For patients with a treatment-resistant and rapidly progressing form of head and neck cancer, immunotherapy appears to double overall survival and improve quality of life, with fewer side effects. The new findings from the large, randomized international trial were considered so successful that the trial was stopped early to allow patients in the comparison group…

Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia. All efforts made in AD research during the last four decades provided important insights into the pathogenesis of AD but the cause of the disease is still unclear and the treatment unresolved. The clinical manifestations of AD begin with subtle short-term memory deficit and anxio-depressive…